Peer Victimization among Classmates—Associations with Students’ Internalizing Problems, Self-Esteem, and Life Satisfaction

Bullying is a major problem in schools and a large number of studies have demonstrated that victims have a high excess risk of poor mental health. It may however also affect those who are not directly victimized by peers. The present study investigates whether peer victimization among classmates is...

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Main Authors: Sara B. Låftman, Bitte Modin
Format: Article
Language:English
Published: MDPI AG 2017-10-01
Series:International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Subjects:
Online Access:https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/14/10/1218
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spelling doaj-60221e0612db4c139e6262158d3d41092020-11-25T00:46:09ZengMDPI AGInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health1660-46012017-10-011410121810.3390/ijerph14101218ijerph14101218Peer Victimization among Classmates—Associations with Students’ Internalizing Problems, Self-Esteem, and Life SatisfactionSara B. Låftman0Bitte Modin1Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet, SE-10691 Stockholm, SwedenCentre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet, SE-10691 Stockholm, SwedenBullying is a major problem in schools and a large number of studies have demonstrated that victims have a high excess risk of poor mental health. It may however also affect those who are not directly victimized by peers. The present study investigates whether peer victimization among classmates is linked to internalizing problems, self-esteem, and life satisfaction at the individual level, when the student’s own victimization has been taken into account. The data were derived from the first wave of the Swedish part of Youth in Europe Study (YES!), including information on 4319 students in grade 8 (14–15 years of age) distributed across 242 classes. Results from multilevel analyses show a significant association between classes with a high proportion of students being victimized and higher levels of internalizing problems, lower self-esteem, and lower life satisfaction at the student level. This association holds when the student’s own victimization has been taken into account. This suggests that peer victimization negatively affects those who are directly exposed, as well as their classmates. We conclude that efficient methods and interventions to reduce bullying in school are likely to benefit not only those who are victimized, but all students.https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/14/10/1218bullyingvictimizationcontextualschool climatewell-beingadolescents
collection DOAJ
language English
format Article
sources DOAJ
author Sara B. Låftman
Bitte Modin
spellingShingle Sara B. Låftman
Bitte Modin
Peer Victimization among Classmates—Associations with Students’ Internalizing Problems, Self-Esteem, and Life Satisfaction
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
bullying
victimization
contextual
school climate
well-being
adolescents
author_facet Sara B. Låftman
Bitte Modin
author_sort Sara B. Låftman
title Peer Victimization among Classmates—Associations with Students’ Internalizing Problems, Self-Esteem, and Life Satisfaction
title_short Peer Victimization among Classmates—Associations with Students’ Internalizing Problems, Self-Esteem, and Life Satisfaction
title_full Peer Victimization among Classmates—Associations with Students’ Internalizing Problems, Self-Esteem, and Life Satisfaction
title_fullStr Peer Victimization among Classmates—Associations with Students’ Internalizing Problems, Self-Esteem, and Life Satisfaction
title_full_unstemmed Peer Victimization among Classmates—Associations with Students’ Internalizing Problems, Self-Esteem, and Life Satisfaction
title_sort peer victimization among classmates—associations with students’ internalizing problems, self-esteem, and life satisfaction
publisher MDPI AG
series International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
issn 1660-4601
publishDate 2017-10-01
description Bullying is a major problem in schools and a large number of studies have demonstrated that victims have a high excess risk of poor mental health. It may however also affect those who are not directly victimized by peers. The present study investigates whether peer victimization among classmates is linked to internalizing problems, self-esteem, and life satisfaction at the individual level, when the student’s own victimization has been taken into account. The data were derived from the first wave of the Swedish part of Youth in Europe Study (YES!), including information on 4319 students in grade 8 (14–15 years of age) distributed across 242 classes. Results from multilevel analyses show a significant association between classes with a high proportion of students being victimized and higher levels of internalizing problems, lower self-esteem, and lower life satisfaction at the student level. This association holds when the student’s own victimization has been taken into account. This suggests that peer victimization negatively affects those who are directly exposed, as well as their classmates. We conclude that efficient methods and interventions to reduce bullying in school are likely to benefit not only those who are victimized, but all students.
topic bullying
victimization
contextual
school climate
well-being
adolescents
url https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/14/10/1218
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