Evidence for Separate Contributions of High and Low Spatial Frequencies during Visual Word Recognition

Previous studies have shown that different spatial frequency information processing streams interact during the recognition of visual stimuli. However, it is a matter of debate as to the contributions of high and low spatial frequency (HSF and LSF) information for visual word recognition. This study...

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Main Authors: Kurt Winsler, Phillip J. Holcomb, Katherine J. Midgley, Jonathan Grainger
Format: Article
Language:English
Published: Frontiers Media S.A. 2017-06-01
Series:Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Subjects:
ERP
Online Access:http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnhum.2017.00324/full
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spelling doaj-9668812af18a4f66b0fff5097b8afd1c2020-11-25T02:01:56ZengFrontiers Media S.A.Frontiers in Human Neuroscience1662-51612017-06-011110.3389/fnhum.2017.00324256818Evidence for Separate Contributions of High and Low Spatial Frequencies during Visual Word RecognitionKurt Winsler0Phillip J. Holcomb1Katherine J. Midgley2Jonathan Grainger3NeuroCognition Laboratory, Department of Psychology, San Diego State UniversitySan Diego, CA, United StatesNeuroCognition Laboratory, Department of Psychology, San Diego State UniversitySan Diego, CA, United StatesNeuroCognition Laboratory, Department of Psychology, San Diego State UniversitySan Diego, CA, United StatesLaboratoire de Psychologie Cognitive, CNRS and Aix-Marseille UniversitéMarseille, FrancePrevious studies have shown that different spatial frequency information processing streams interact during the recognition of visual stimuli. However, it is a matter of debate as to the contributions of high and low spatial frequency (HSF and LSF) information for visual word recognition. This study examined the role of different spatial frequencies in visual word recognition using event-related potential (ERP) masked priming. EEG was recorded from 32 scalp sites in 30 English-speaking adults in a go/no-go semantic categorization task. Stimuli were white characters on a neutral gray background. Targets were uppercase five letter words preceded by a forward-mask (#######) and a 50 ms lowercase prime. Primes were either the same word (repeated) or a different word (un-repeated) than the subsequent target and either contained only high, only low, or full spatial frequency information. Additionally within each condition, half of the prime-target pairs were high lexical frequency, and half were low. In the full spatial frequency condition, typical ERP masked priming effects were found with an attenuated N250 (sub-lexical) and N400 (lexical-semantic) for repeated compared to un-repeated primes. For HSF primes there was a weaker N250 effect which interacted with lexical frequency, a significant reversal of the effect around 300 ms, and an N400-like effect for only high lexical frequency word pairs. LSF primes did not produce any of the classic ERP repetition priming effects, however they did elicit a distinct early effect around 200 ms in the opposite direction of typical repetition effects. HSF information accounted for many of the masked repetition priming ERP effects and therefore suggests that HSFs are more crucial for word recognition. However, LSFs did produce their own pattern of priming effects indicating that larger scale information may still play a role in word recognition.http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnhum.2017.00324/fullspatial frequencyword recognitionmasked primingERPN400N250
collection DOAJ
language English
format Article
sources DOAJ
author Kurt Winsler
Phillip J. Holcomb
Katherine J. Midgley
Jonathan Grainger
spellingShingle Kurt Winsler
Phillip J. Holcomb
Katherine J. Midgley
Jonathan Grainger
Evidence for Separate Contributions of High and Low Spatial Frequencies during Visual Word Recognition
Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
spatial frequency
word recognition
masked priming
ERP
N400
N250
author_facet Kurt Winsler
Phillip J. Holcomb
Katherine J. Midgley
Jonathan Grainger
author_sort Kurt Winsler
title Evidence for Separate Contributions of High and Low Spatial Frequencies during Visual Word Recognition
title_short Evidence for Separate Contributions of High and Low Spatial Frequencies during Visual Word Recognition
title_full Evidence for Separate Contributions of High and Low Spatial Frequencies during Visual Word Recognition
title_fullStr Evidence for Separate Contributions of High and Low Spatial Frequencies during Visual Word Recognition
title_full_unstemmed Evidence for Separate Contributions of High and Low Spatial Frequencies during Visual Word Recognition
title_sort evidence for separate contributions of high and low spatial frequencies during visual word recognition
publisher Frontiers Media S.A.
series Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
issn 1662-5161
publishDate 2017-06-01
description Previous studies have shown that different spatial frequency information processing streams interact during the recognition of visual stimuli. However, it is a matter of debate as to the contributions of high and low spatial frequency (HSF and LSF) information for visual word recognition. This study examined the role of different spatial frequencies in visual word recognition using event-related potential (ERP) masked priming. EEG was recorded from 32 scalp sites in 30 English-speaking adults in a go/no-go semantic categorization task. Stimuli were white characters on a neutral gray background. Targets were uppercase five letter words preceded by a forward-mask (#######) and a 50 ms lowercase prime. Primes were either the same word (repeated) or a different word (un-repeated) than the subsequent target and either contained only high, only low, or full spatial frequency information. Additionally within each condition, half of the prime-target pairs were high lexical frequency, and half were low. In the full spatial frequency condition, typical ERP masked priming effects were found with an attenuated N250 (sub-lexical) and N400 (lexical-semantic) for repeated compared to un-repeated primes. For HSF primes there was a weaker N250 effect which interacted with lexical frequency, a significant reversal of the effect around 300 ms, and an N400-like effect for only high lexical frequency word pairs. LSF primes did not produce any of the classic ERP repetition priming effects, however they did elicit a distinct early effect around 200 ms in the opposite direction of typical repetition effects. HSF information accounted for many of the masked repetition priming ERP effects and therefore suggests that HSFs are more crucial for word recognition. However, LSFs did produce their own pattern of priming effects indicating that larger scale information may still play a role in word recognition.
topic spatial frequency
word recognition
masked priming
ERP
N400
N250
url http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnhum.2017.00324/full
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