Knowledge gaps among South African healthcare providers regarding the prevention of neonatal group B streptococcal disease.

OBJECTIVE:To evaluate obstetric healthcare provider knowledge regarding the prevention of group B streptococcal disease in South African infants. METHODS:Questionnaires exploring knowledge, attitudes and beliefs around group B streptococcal prevention were administered to consenting doctors and mate...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Authors: Caris A Price, Lionel Green-Thompson, Vijay G Mammen, Shabir A Madhi, Sanjay G Lala, Ziyaad Dangor
Format: Article
Language:English
Published: Public Library of Science (PLoS) 2018-01-01
Series:PLoS ONE
Online Access:http://europepmc.org/articles/PMC6173416?pdf=render
Description
Summary:OBJECTIVE:To evaluate obstetric healthcare provider knowledge regarding the prevention of group B streptococcal disease in South African infants. METHODS:Questionnaires exploring knowledge, attitudes and beliefs around group B streptococcal prevention were administered to consenting doctors and maternity nurses in a tertiary academic hospital. Qualitative assessments (focus groups) were undertaken with junior doctors and nurses. RESULTS:238 participants completed the questionnaire: 150 (63.0%) doctors and 88 (37.0%) nurses. Overall, 22.7% of participants correctly identified the risk-based prevention protocol recommended at this hospital. Most doctors (68.0%) and nurses (94.3%) could not correctly list a single risk factor. A third of doctors did not know the correct antibiotic protocols, and most (80.0%) did not know the recommended timing of antibiotics in relation to delivery. Focus group discussions highlighted the lack of knowledge, awareness and effective implementation of protocols regarding disease prevention. CONCLUSIONS:Our study highlighted knowledge gaps on the risk-based prevention strategy in a setting which has consistently reported among the highest incidence of invasive group B streptococcal disease globally. In these settings, education and prioritization of the risk-based intrapartum antibiotic strategy is warranted, but an alternative vaccine-based strategy may prove more effective in preventing invasive group B streptococcal disease in the long-term.
ISSN:1932-6203