Implicit motives predict affective responses to emotional expressions

We explored the influence of implicit motives and activity inhibition on subjectively experienced affect in response to the presentation of six different facial expressions of emotion (FEEs; anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise) and neutral faces from the NimStim set of facial expr...

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Main Authors: Andreas G. Rösch, Steven J Stanton, Oliver C. Schultheiss
Format: Article
Language:English
Published: Frontiers Media S.A. 2013-12-01
Series:Frontiers in Psychology
Subjects:
Online Access:http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00985/full
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spelling doaj-a1663d1522554348b4bf18b293431e5c2020-11-24T20:55:20ZengFrontiers Media S.A.Frontiers in Psychology1664-10782013-12-01410.3389/fpsyg.2013.0098565064Implicit motives predict affective responses to emotional expressionsAndreas G. Rösch0Steven J Stanton1Oliver C. Schultheiss2Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-NurembergOakland UniversityFriedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-NurembergWe explored the influence of implicit motives and activity inhibition on subjectively experienced affect in response to the presentation of six different facial expressions of emotion (FEEs; anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise) and neutral faces from the NimStim set of facial expressions (Tottenham et al., 2009). Implicit motives and activity inhibition were assessed using a Picture Story Exercise (Schultheiss et al., 2009b). Ratings of subjectively experienced affect (arousal and valence) were assessed using Self-Assessment Manikins (Bradley and Lang, 1994) in a sample of 84 participants. We found that people with either a strong implicit power or achievement motive experienced stronger arousal, while people with a strong affiliation motive experienced less aroused and felt more unpleasant across emotions. Additionally, we obtained significant power motive × activity inhibition interactions for arousal ratings in response to FEEs and neutral faces. Participants with a strong power motive and weak activity inhibition experienced stronger arousal after the presentation of neutral faces but no additional increase in arousal after the presentation of FEEs. Participants with a strong power motive and strong activity inhibition (inhibited power motive) did not feel aroused by neutral faces. However, their arousal increased in response to all FEEs with the exception of happy faces, for which their subjective arousal decreased. These more differentiated reaction pattern of individuals with an inhibited power motive suggest that they engage in a more socially adaptive manner of responding to different FEEs. Our findings extend established links between implicit motives and affective processes found at the procedural level to declarative reactions to FEEs. Implications are discussed with respect to dual-process models of motivation and research in motive congruence.http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00985/fullAffectArousalemotionValenceimplicit motivesactivity inhibition
collection DOAJ
language English
format Article
sources DOAJ
author Andreas G. Rösch
Steven J Stanton
Oliver C. Schultheiss
spellingShingle Andreas G. Rösch
Steven J Stanton
Oliver C. Schultheiss
Implicit motives predict affective responses to emotional expressions
Frontiers in Psychology
Affect
Arousal
emotion
Valence
implicit motives
activity inhibition
author_facet Andreas G. Rösch
Steven J Stanton
Oliver C. Schultheiss
author_sort Andreas G. Rösch
title Implicit motives predict affective responses to emotional expressions
title_short Implicit motives predict affective responses to emotional expressions
title_full Implicit motives predict affective responses to emotional expressions
title_fullStr Implicit motives predict affective responses to emotional expressions
title_full_unstemmed Implicit motives predict affective responses to emotional expressions
title_sort implicit motives predict affective responses to emotional expressions
publisher Frontiers Media S.A.
series Frontiers in Psychology
issn 1664-1078
publishDate 2013-12-01
description We explored the influence of implicit motives and activity inhibition on subjectively experienced affect in response to the presentation of six different facial expressions of emotion (FEEs; anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise) and neutral faces from the NimStim set of facial expressions (Tottenham et al., 2009). Implicit motives and activity inhibition were assessed using a Picture Story Exercise (Schultheiss et al., 2009b). Ratings of subjectively experienced affect (arousal and valence) were assessed using Self-Assessment Manikins (Bradley and Lang, 1994) in a sample of 84 participants. We found that people with either a strong implicit power or achievement motive experienced stronger arousal, while people with a strong affiliation motive experienced less aroused and felt more unpleasant across emotions. Additionally, we obtained significant power motive × activity inhibition interactions for arousal ratings in response to FEEs and neutral faces. Participants with a strong power motive and weak activity inhibition experienced stronger arousal after the presentation of neutral faces but no additional increase in arousal after the presentation of FEEs. Participants with a strong power motive and strong activity inhibition (inhibited power motive) did not feel aroused by neutral faces. However, their arousal increased in response to all FEEs with the exception of happy faces, for which their subjective arousal decreased. These more differentiated reaction pattern of individuals with an inhibited power motive suggest that they engage in a more socially adaptive manner of responding to different FEEs. Our findings extend established links between implicit motives and affective processes found at the procedural level to declarative reactions to FEEs. Implications are discussed with respect to dual-process models of motivation and research in motive congruence.
topic Affect
Arousal
emotion
Valence
implicit motives
activity inhibition
url http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00985/full
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AT olivercschultheiss implicitmotivespredictaffectiveresponsestoemotionalexpressions
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