Printed Electrodes in Microfluidic Arrays for Cancer Biomarker Protein Detection

Medical diagnostics is trending towards a more personalized future approach in which multiple tests can be digitized into patient records. In cancer diagnostics, patients can be tested for individual protein and genomic biomarkers that detect cancers at very early stages and also be used to monitor...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Authors: Lasangi Dhanapala, Colleen E. Krause, Abby L. Jones, James F. Rusling
Format: Article
Language:English
Published: MDPI AG 2020-09-01
Series:Biosensors
Subjects:
Online Access:https://www.mdpi.com/2079-6374/10/9/115
Description
Summary:Medical diagnostics is trending towards a more personalized future approach in which multiple tests can be digitized into patient records. In cancer diagnostics, patients can be tested for individual protein and genomic biomarkers that detect cancers at very early stages and also be used to monitor cancer progression or remission during therapy. These data can then be incorporated into patient records that could be easily accessed on a cell phone by a health care professional or the patients themselves on demand. Data on protein biomarkers have a large potential to be measured in point-of-care devices, particularly diagnostic panels that could provide a continually updated, personalized record of a disease like cancer. Electrochemical immunoassays have been popular among protein detection methods due to their inherent high sensitivity and ease of coupling with screen-printed and inkjet-printed electrodes. Integrated chips featuring these kinds of electrodes can be built at low cost and designed for ease of automation. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) features are adopted in most of these ultrasensitive detection systems, with microfluidics allowing easy manipulation and good fluid dynamics to deliver reagents and detect the desired proteins. Several of these ultrasensitive systems have detected biomarker panels ranging from four to eight proteins, which in many cases when a specific cancer is suspected may be sufficient. However, a grand challenge lies in engineering microfluidic-printed electrode devices for the simultaneous detection of larger protein panels (e.g., 50–100) that could be used to test for many types of cancers, as well as other diseases for truly personalized care.
ISSN:2079-6374