Perseverative thinking in depression and anxiety

The current study investigated the impact of worry and brooding as moderators of the tripartite model of depression and anxiety (TMDA). We hypothesized that both types of perseverative thinking would moderate the association between negative affectivity (NA) and both anxiety and depression. Complete...

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Main Authors: Sonja eSorg, Claus eVögele, Nadine eFurka, Andrea Hans Meyer
Format: Article
Language:English
Published: Frontiers Media S.A. 2012-02-01
Series:Frontiers in Psychology
Subjects:
Online Access:http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fpsyg.2012.00020/full
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spelling doaj-b0b3444d668f4a6a8ded1089c5c2b6642020-11-24T20:58:59ZengFrontiers Media S.A.Frontiers in Psychology1664-10782012-02-01310.3389/fpsyg.2012.0002015359Perseverative thinking in depression and anxietySonja eSorg0Claus eVögele1Nadine eFurka2Andrea Hans Meyer3Université du LuxembourgUniversité du LuxembourgUniversity of LeipzigUniversity of BaselThe current study investigated the impact of worry and brooding as moderators of the tripartite model of depression and anxiety (TMDA). We hypothesized that both types of perseverative thinking would moderate the association between negative affectivity (NA) and both anxiety and depression. Complete data sets for this questionnaire survey were obtained from 537 students. Participants’ age ranged from 16 to 49 years with a mean age of 21.1 years (SD = 3.6). Overall, results from path analyses supported the assumptions of the TMDA, in that negative affectivity was a non-specific predictor for both depression and anxiety whilst lack of positive affectivity was related to depression only. Unexpectedly, perseverative thinking had an effect on the dependency of negative and positive affectivity. Worry was a significant moderator for the path NA – anxiety. All other hypothesized associations were only marginally significant. Alternative pathways as well as methodological implications regarding similarities and differences of the two types of perseverative thinking are discussed.http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fpsyg.2012.00020/fullAnxietyDepressionworrybroodingperseverative thinkingrumination
collection DOAJ
language English
format Article
sources DOAJ
author Sonja eSorg
Claus eVögele
Nadine eFurka
Andrea Hans Meyer
spellingShingle Sonja eSorg
Claus eVögele
Nadine eFurka
Andrea Hans Meyer
Perseverative thinking in depression and anxiety
Frontiers in Psychology
Anxiety
Depression
worry
brooding
perseverative thinking
rumination
author_facet Sonja eSorg
Claus eVögele
Nadine eFurka
Andrea Hans Meyer
author_sort Sonja eSorg
title Perseverative thinking in depression and anxiety
title_short Perseverative thinking in depression and anxiety
title_full Perseverative thinking in depression and anxiety
title_fullStr Perseverative thinking in depression and anxiety
title_full_unstemmed Perseverative thinking in depression and anxiety
title_sort perseverative thinking in depression and anxiety
publisher Frontiers Media S.A.
series Frontiers in Psychology
issn 1664-1078
publishDate 2012-02-01
description The current study investigated the impact of worry and brooding as moderators of the tripartite model of depression and anxiety (TMDA). We hypothesized that both types of perseverative thinking would moderate the association between negative affectivity (NA) and both anxiety and depression. Complete data sets for this questionnaire survey were obtained from 537 students. Participants’ age ranged from 16 to 49 years with a mean age of 21.1 years (SD = 3.6). Overall, results from path analyses supported the assumptions of the TMDA, in that negative affectivity was a non-specific predictor for both depression and anxiety whilst lack of positive affectivity was related to depression only. Unexpectedly, perseverative thinking had an effect on the dependency of negative and positive affectivity. Worry was a significant moderator for the path NA – anxiety. All other hypothesized associations were only marginally significant. Alternative pathways as well as methodological implications regarding similarities and differences of the two types of perseverative thinking are discussed.
topic Anxiety
Depression
worry
brooding
perseverative thinking
rumination
url http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fpsyg.2012.00020/full
work_keys_str_mv AT sonjaesorg perseverativethinkingindepressionandanxiety
AT clausevogele perseverativethinkingindepressionandanxiety
AT nadineefurka perseverativethinkingindepressionandanxiety
AT andreahansmeyer perseverativethinkingindepressionandanxiety
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