Incidental Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings and the Cognitive and Motor Performance in the Elderly: The Shanghai Changfeng Study

BackgroundThe frequently discovered incidental findings (IFs) from imaging observations are increasing. The IFs show the potential clues of structural abnormalities underlying cognitive decline in elders. Detecting brain IFs and their relationship with cognitive and behavioral functions helps provid...

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Main Authors: Liangqi Wang, Huandong Lin, Yifeng Peng, Zehua Zhao, Lingyan Chen, Li Wu, Ting Liu, Jing Li, Anna Liu, Chun-Yi Zac Lo, Xin Gao
Format: Article
Language:English
Published: Frontiers Media S.A. 2021-02-01
Series:Frontiers in Neuroscience
Subjects:
Online Access:https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnins.2021.631087/full
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language English
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author Liangqi Wang
Liangqi Wang
Liangqi Wang
Liangqi Wang
Huandong Lin
Huandong Lin
Huandong Lin
Yifeng Peng
Zehua Zhao
Lingyan Chen
Li Wu
Li Wu
Ting Liu
Jing Li
Anna Liu
Chun-Yi Zac Lo
Xin Gao
Xin Gao
Xin Gao
spellingShingle Liangqi Wang
Liangqi Wang
Liangqi Wang
Liangqi Wang
Huandong Lin
Huandong Lin
Huandong Lin
Yifeng Peng
Zehua Zhao
Lingyan Chen
Li Wu
Li Wu
Ting Liu
Jing Li
Anna Liu
Chun-Yi Zac Lo
Xin Gao
Xin Gao
Xin Gao
Incidental Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings and the Cognitive and Motor Performance in the Elderly: The Shanghai Changfeng Study
Frontiers in Neuroscience
magnetic resonance imaging
brain
incidental findings
aging
cognition
author_facet Liangqi Wang
Liangqi Wang
Liangqi Wang
Liangqi Wang
Huandong Lin
Huandong Lin
Huandong Lin
Yifeng Peng
Zehua Zhao
Lingyan Chen
Li Wu
Li Wu
Ting Liu
Jing Li
Anna Liu
Chun-Yi Zac Lo
Xin Gao
Xin Gao
Xin Gao
author_sort Liangqi Wang
title Incidental Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings and the Cognitive and Motor Performance in the Elderly: The Shanghai Changfeng Study
title_short Incidental Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings and the Cognitive and Motor Performance in the Elderly: The Shanghai Changfeng Study
title_full Incidental Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings and the Cognitive and Motor Performance in the Elderly: The Shanghai Changfeng Study
title_fullStr Incidental Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings and the Cognitive and Motor Performance in the Elderly: The Shanghai Changfeng Study
title_full_unstemmed Incidental Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings and the Cognitive and Motor Performance in the Elderly: The Shanghai Changfeng Study
title_sort incidental brain magnetic resonance imaging findings and the cognitive and motor performance in the elderly: the shanghai changfeng study
publisher Frontiers Media S.A.
series Frontiers in Neuroscience
issn 1662-453X
publishDate 2021-02-01
description BackgroundThe frequently discovered incidental findings (IFs) from imaging observations are increasing. The IFs show the potential clues of structural abnormalities underlying cognitive decline in elders. Detecting brain IFs and their relationship with cognitive and behavioral functions helps provide the information for clinical strategies.MethodsFive hundred and seventy-nine participants were recruited in the Shanghai Changfeng Study. All participants performed the demographic, biochemical, and cognitive functions and gait speed assessment and underwent the high-resolution multimodal magnetic resonance imaging scans. We calculated the detection rate of brain IFs. The association between cardiovascular risk factors and IFs and the associations between IFs and cognitive and motor functions were assessed using regression models. The relationships among gray matter volume, cognitive function, and gait speed were assessed with/without adjusting the IFs to evaluate the effects of potential IFs confounders.ResultsIFs were found in a total of 578 subjects with a detection rate of 99.8%. Age and blood pressure were the most significant cardiovascular risk factors correlated with IFs. IFs were found to be negatively associated with Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Mini-Mental State Examination, and gait speed. The gray matter volume was found to be positively correlated with the cognitive function without adjusting the white matter hyperintensity but not if adjusted.ConclusionIFs are commonly found in the elderly population and related to brain functions. The adequate intervention of IFs related cardiovascular risk factors that may slow down the progression of brain function decline. We also suggest that IFs should be considered as confounding factors that may affect cognitive issues on the structural neuroimaging researches in aging or diseases.
topic magnetic resonance imaging
brain
incidental findings
aging
cognition
url https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnins.2021.631087/full
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spelling doaj-c0d6806580cc4f5f8637bd288de146d52021-02-19T07:01:24ZengFrontiers Media S.A.Frontiers in Neuroscience1662-453X2021-02-011510.3389/fnins.2021.631087631087Incidental Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings and the Cognitive and Motor Performance in the Elderly: The Shanghai Changfeng StudyLiangqi Wang0Liangqi Wang1Liangqi Wang2Liangqi Wang3Huandong Lin4Huandong Lin5Huandong Lin6Yifeng Peng7Zehua Zhao8Lingyan Chen9Li Wu10Li Wu11Ting Liu12Jing Li13Anna Liu14Chun-Yi Zac Lo15Xin Gao16Xin Gao17Xin Gao18Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, ChinaHuman Phenome Institute, Fudan University, Shanghai, ChinaSchool of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, ChinaDepartment of Radiology, Putuo Hospital, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, ChinaDepartment of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, ChinaHuman Phenome Institute, Fudan University, Shanghai, ChinaInstitute for Metabolic Diseases, Fudan University, Shanghai, ChinaDepartment of Radiology, Putuo Hospital, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, ChinaDepartment of Radiology, Putuo Hospital, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, ChinaDepartment of Geriatrics, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, ChinaDepartment of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, ChinaInstitute for Metabolic Diseases, Fudan University, Shanghai, ChinaDepartment of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, ChinaDepartment of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, ChinaDepartment of Radiology, Putuo Hospital, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, ChinaInstitute of Science and Technology for Brain Inspired Intelligence, Fudan University, Shanghai, ChinaDepartment of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, ChinaHuman Phenome Institute, Fudan University, Shanghai, ChinaInstitute for Metabolic Diseases, Fudan University, Shanghai, ChinaBackgroundThe frequently discovered incidental findings (IFs) from imaging observations are increasing. The IFs show the potential clues of structural abnormalities underlying cognitive decline in elders. Detecting brain IFs and their relationship with cognitive and behavioral functions helps provide the information for clinical strategies.MethodsFive hundred and seventy-nine participants were recruited in the Shanghai Changfeng Study. All participants performed the demographic, biochemical, and cognitive functions and gait speed assessment and underwent the high-resolution multimodal magnetic resonance imaging scans. We calculated the detection rate of brain IFs. The association between cardiovascular risk factors and IFs and the associations between IFs and cognitive and motor functions were assessed using regression models. The relationships among gray matter volume, cognitive function, and gait speed were assessed with/without adjusting the IFs to evaluate the effects of potential IFs confounders.ResultsIFs were found in a total of 578 subjects with a detection rate of 99.8%. Age and blood pressure were the most significant cardiovascular risk factors correlated with IFs. IFs were found to be negatively associated with Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Mini-Mental State Examination, and gait speed. The gray matter volume was found to be positively correlated with the cognitive function without adjusting the white matter hyperintensity but not if adjusted.ConclusionIFs are commonly found in the elderly population and related to brain functions. The adequate intervention of IFs related cardiovascular risk factors that may slow down the progression of brain function decline. We also suggest that IFs should be considered as confounding factors that may affect cognitive issues on the structural neuroimaging researches in aging or diseases.https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnins.2021.631087/fullmagnetic resonance imagingbrainincidental findingsagingcognition