The clinician crowdsourcing challenge: using participatory design to seed implementation strategies

Abstract Background In healthcare settings, system and organization leaders often control the selection and design of implementation strategies even though frontline workers may have the most intimate understanding of the care delivery process, and factors that optimize and constrain evidence-based...

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Main Authors: Rebecca E. Stewart, Nathaniel Williams, Y. Vivian Byeon, Alison Buttenheim, Sriram Sridharan, Kelly Zentgraf, David T. Jones, Katelin Hoskins, Molly Candon, Rinad S. Beidas
Format: Article
Language:English
Published: BMC 2019-06-01
Series:Implementation Science
Subjects:
Online Access:http://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s13012-019-0914-2
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spelling doaj-ccd38f1f118c458a859241a1bfcb793c2020-11-25T03:50:02ZengBMCImplementation Science1748-59082019-06-011411810.1186/s13012-019-0914-2The clinician crowdsourcing challenge: using participatory design to seed implementation strategiesRebecca E. Stewart0Nathaniel Williams1Y. Vivian Byeon2Alison Buttenheim3Sriram Sridharan4Kelly Zentgraf5David T. Jones6Katelin Hoskins7Molly Candon8Rinad S. Beidas9Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of MedicineSchool of Social Work, Boise State UniversityDepartment of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of MedicineDepartment of Medical Ethics and Health Policy, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvaniaideas42Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of MedicineDepartment of Behavioral Health and Intellectual DisAbility ServicesDepartment of Family and Community Health, School of Nursing, University of PennsylvaniaDepartment of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of MedicineDepartment of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of MedicineAbstract Background In healthcare settings, system and organization leaders often control the selection and design of implementation strategies even though frontline workers may have the most intimate understanding of the care delivery process, and factors that optimize and constrain evidence-based practice implementation within the local system. Innovation tournaments, a structured participatory design strategy to crowdsource ideas, are a promising approach to participatory design that may increase the effectiveness of implementation strategies by involving end users (i.e., clinicians). We utilized a system-wide innovation tournament to garner ideas from clinicians about how to enhance the use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) within a large public behavioral health system. Methods Our innovation tournament occurred in three phases. First, we invited over 500 clinicians to share, through a web-based platform, their ideas regarding how their organizations could best support use of EBPs. Clinicians could rate and comment on ideas submitted by others. Second, submissions were judged by an expert panel (including behavioral scientists, system leaders, and payers) based on their rated enthusiasm for the idea. Third, we held a community-facing event during which the six clinicians who submitted winning ideas presented their strategies to 85 attendees representing a cross-section of clinicians and system and organizational leaders. Results We had a high rate of participation (12.3%), more than double the average rate of previous tournaments conducted in other settings (5%). A total of 65 ideas were submitted by 55 participants representing 38 organizations. The most common categories of ideas pertained to training (42%), financing and compensation (26%), clinician support and preparation tools (22%), and EBP-focused supervision (17%). The expert panel and clinicians differed on their ratings of the ideas, highlighting value of seeking input from multiple stakeholder groups when developing implementation strategies. Conclusions Innovation tournaments are a useful and feasible methodology for engaging end users, system leaders, and behavioral scientists through a structured approach to developing implementation strategies. The process and resultant strategies engendered significant enthusiasm and engagement from participants at all levels of a healthcare system. Research is needed to compare the effectiveness of strategies developed through innovation tournaments to strategies developed through design approaches.http://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s13012-019-0914-2Evidence-based practicesParticipatory designImplementation strategiesCommunity mental health
collection DOAJ
language English
format Article
sources DOAJ
author Rebecca E. Stewart
Nathaniel Williams
Y. Vivian Byeon
Alison Buttenheim
Sriram Sridharan
Kelly Zentgraf
David T. Jones
Katelin Hoskins
Molly Candon
Rinad S. Beidas
spellingShingle Rebecca E. Stewart
Nathaniel Williams
Y. Vivian Byeon
Alison Buttenheim
Sriram Sridharan
Kelly Zentgraf
David T. Jones
Katelin Hoskins
Molly Candon
Rinad S. Beidas
The clinician crowdsourcing challenge: using participatory design to seed implementation strategies
Implementation Science
Evidence-based practices
Participatory design
Implementation strategies
Community mental health
author_facet Rebecca E. Stewart
Nathaniel Williams
Y. Vivian Byeon
Alison Buttenheim
Sriram Sridharan
Kelly Zentgraf
David T. Jones
Katelin Hoskins
Molly Candon
Rinad S. Beidas
author_sort Rebecca E. Stewart
title The clinician crowdsourcing challenge: using participatory design to seed implementation strategies
title_short The clinician crowdsourcing challenge: using participatory design to seed implementation strategies
title_full The clinician crowdsourcing challenge: using participatory design to seed implementation strategies
title_fullStr The clinician crowdsourcing challenge: using participatory design to seed implementation strategies
title_full_unstemmed The clinician crowdsourcing challenge: using participatory design to seed implementation strategies
title_sort clinician crowdsourcing challenge: using participatory design to seed implementation strategies
publisher BMC
series Implementation Science
issn 1748-5908
publishDate 2019-06-01
description Abstract Background In healthcare settings, system and organization leaders often control the selection and design of implementation strategies even though frontline workers may have the most intimate understanding of the care delivery process, and factors that optimize and constrain evidence-based practice implementation within the local system. Innovation tournaments, a structured participatory design strategy to crowdsource ideas, are a promising approach to participatory design that may increase the effectiveness of implementation strategies by involving end users (i.e., clinicians). We utilized a system-wide innovation tournament to garner ideas from clinicians about how to enhance the use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) within a large public behavioral health system. Methods Our innovation tournament occurred in three phases. First, we invited over 500 clinicians to share, through a web-based platform, their ideas regarding how their organizations could best support use of EBPs. Clinicians could rate and comment on ideas submitted by others. Second, submissions were judged by an expert panel (including behavioral scientists, system leaders, and payers) based on their rated enthusiasm for the idea. Third, we held a community-facing event during which the six clinicians who submitted winning ideas presented their strategies to 85 attendees representing a cross-section of clinicians and system and organizational leaders. Results We had a high rate of participation (12.3%), more than double the average rate of previous tournaments conducted in other settings (5%). A total of 65 ideas were submitted by 55 participants representing 38 organizations. The most common categories of ideas pertained to training (42%), financing and compensation (26%), clinician support and preparation tools (22%), and EBP-focused supervision (17%). The expert panel and clinicians differed on their ratings of the ideas, highlighting value of seeking input from multiple stakeholder groups when developing implementation strategies. Conclusions Innovation tournaments are a useful and feasible methodology for engaging end users, system leaders, and behavioral scientists through a structured approach to developing implementation strategies. The process and resultant strategies engendered significant enthusiasm and engagement from participants at all levels of a healthcare system. Research is needed to compare the effectiveness of strategies developed through innovation tournaments to strategies developed through design approaches.
topic Evidence-based practices
Participatory design
Implementation strategies
Community mental health
url http://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s13012-019-0914-2
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