Bistatic and Stereoscopic Configurations for HF Radar

Most HF radars operate in a monostatic or quasi-monostatic configuration. The collocation of transmit and receive facilities simplifies testing and maintenance, reduces demands on communications networks, and enables the use of established and relatively straightforward signal processing and data in...

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Main Author: Stuart Anderson
Format: Article
Language:English
Published: MDPI AG 2020-02-01
Series:Remote Sensing
Subjects:
Online Access:https://www.mdpi.com/2072-4292/12/4/689
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spelling doaj-ffb2961227e24821a3a8babe4bca90e12020-11-25T00:31:11ZengMDPI AGRemote Sensing2072-42922020-02-0112468910.3390/rs12040689rs12040689Bistatic and Stereoscopic Configurations for HF RadarStuart Anderson0Physics Department, University of Adelaide, Adelaide 5005, AustraliaMost HF radars operate in a monostatic or quasi-monostatic configuration. The collocation of transmit and receive facilities simplifies testing and maintenance, reduces demands on communications networks, and enables the use of established and relatively straightforward signal processing and data interpretation techniques. Radars of this type are well-suited to missions such as current mapping, waveheight measurement, and the detection of ships and aircraft. The high scientific, defense, and economic value of the radar products is evident from the fact that hundreds of HF radars are presently in operation, the great majority of them relying on the surface wave mode of propagation, though some systems employ line-of-sight or skywave modalities. Yet, notwithstanding the versatility and proven capabilities of monostatic HF radars, there are some types of observations for which the monostatic geometry renders them less effective. In these cases, one must turn to more general radar configurations, including those that employ a multiplicity of propagation modalities to achieve the desired illumination, scattering selectivity, and echo reception. In this paper, we survey some of the considerations that arise with bistatic HF radar configurations, explore some of the missions for which they are optimal, and describe some practical techniques that can guide their design and deployment.https://www.mdpi.com/2072-4292/12/4/689hf radarbistatic radarhfswroth radar
collection DOAJ
language English
format Article
sources DOAJ
author Stuart Anderson
spellingShingle Stuart Anderson
Bistatic and Stereoscopic Configurations for HF Radar
Remote Sensing
hf radar
bistatic radar
hfswr
oth radar
author_facet Stuart Anderson
author_sort Stuart Anderson
title Bistatic and Stereoscopic Configurations for HF Radar
title_short Bistatic and Stereoscopic Configurations for HF Radar
title_full Bistatic and Stereoscopic Configurations for HF Radar
title_fullStr Bistatic and Stereoscopic Configurations for HF Radar
title_full_unstemmed Bistatic and Stereoscopic Configurations for HF Radar
title_sort bistatic and stereoscopic configurations for hf radar
publisher MDPI AG
series Remote Sensing
issn 2072-4292
publishDate 2020-02-01
description Most HF radars operate in a monostatic or quasi-monostatic configuration. The collocation of transmit and receive facilities simplifies testing and maintenance, reduces demands on communications networks, and enables the use of established and relatively straightforward signal processing and data interpretation techniques. Radars of this type are well-suited to missions such as current mapping, waveheight measurement, and the detection of ships and aircraft. The high scientific, defense, and economic value of the radar products is evident from the fact that hundreds of HF radars are presently in operation, the great majority of them relying on the surface wave mode of propagation, though some systems employ line-of-sight or skywave modalities. Yet, notwithstanding the versatility and proven capabilities of monostatic HF radars, there are some types of observations for which the monostatic geometry renders them less effective. In these cases, one must turn to more general radar configurations, including those that employ a multiplicity of propagation modalities to achieve the desired illumination, scattering selectivity, and echo reception. In this paper, we survey some of the considerations that arise with bistatic HF radar configurations, explore some of the missions for which they are optimal, and describe some practical techniques that can guide their design and deployment.
topic hf radar
bistatic radar
hfswr
oth radar
url https://www.mdpi.com/2072-4292/12/4/689
work_keys_str_mv AT stuartanderson bistaticandstereoscopicconfigurationsforhfradar
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