Understanding the cognitive processes of problem detection and decision making among assisted living caregivers

It is estimated that by 2050 the proportion of older adults in the U.S. will reach 20% (U.S. Census Bureau, 2008). This increase in the elderly population will likely be associated with a greater need for supportive services in various sectors, including healthcare and housing, such as assisted livi...

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Main Author: McBride, Sara
Other Authors: Rogers, Wendy A.
Format: Others
Language:en_US
Published: Georgia Institute of Technology 2014
Subjects:
Online Access:http://hdl.handle.net/1853/51797
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spelling ndltd-GATECH-oai-smartech.gatech.edu-1853-517972014-10-07T03:33:41ZUnderstanding the cognitive processes of problem detection and decision making among assisted living caregiversMcBride, SaraDecision makingAssisted livingCaregiverCongregate housingCaregiversIt is estimated that by 2050 the proportion of older adults in the U.S. will reach 20% (U.S. Census Bureau, 2008). This increase in the elderly population will likely be associated with a greater need for supportive services in various sectors, including healthcare and housing, such as assisted living communities. Many older adults choose to reside in assisted living communities due to increased difficulty managing health conditions or performing activities of daily living (e.g., bathing, toileting, walking). A primary goal of assisted living communities is to help residents maintain their health and well-being. However, little is known about how caregiving staff detect and interpret relevant cues, and what behaviors are taken to address concerns about residents. In addition to investigating these questions, the role of experience in the job was examined by comparing workers with a relatively low level of experience (1 month-16 months) to those with a relatively high level of experience (3+ years). These questions were addressed using a Critical Incident Interview and a Scenario-based Interview. The cues discussed by participants were categorized as Cognitive, Physical, or Emotional in nature. Participants reacted with concern to most of the scenarios, although the ratings they assigned to indicate their level of concern showed a high level of variability across participants. The explanations participants generated for the various scenarios were classified as either general or specific, with the majority of explanations coded as specific. Specific explanations were primarily that the situation was the result of a Cognitive/Emotional/Social issue or a Physical health issue. Of the actions participants described taking to handle the scenarios, gathering and using information was discussed far more than any other action. Participants discussed needing information related to the resident, such as their health, current and recent state, and personal history, as well as elaboration of the cues that initiated the concern in the first place, such as how long the symptom had been present. Participants also discussed various types of knowledge that they used in their decision making process. The most frequently discussed type of knowledge was health conditions and symptoms. Lastly, the data from the current study did not generally reveal differences between the two levels of experience that were examined. A revised model of caregiver decision making and practical contributions are discussed.Georgia Institute of TechnologyRogers, Wendy A.2014-05-22T15:23:27Z2014-05-22T15:23:27Z2014-052014-01-10May 20142014-05-22T15:23:27ZDissertationapplication/pdfhttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/51797en_US
collection NDLTD
language en_US
format Others
sources NDLTD
topic Decision making
Assisted living
Caregiver
Congregate housing
Caregivers
spellingShingle Decision making
Assisted living
Caregiver
Congregate housing
Caregivers
McBride, Sara
Understanding the cognitive processes of problem detection and decision making among assisted living caregivers
description It is estimated that by 2050 the proportion of older adults in the U.S. will reach 20% (U.S. Census Bureau, 2008). This increase in the elderly population will likely be associated with a greater need for supportive services in various sectors, including healthcare and housing, such as assisted living communities. Many older adults choose to reside in assisted living communities due to increased difficulty managing health conditions or performing activities of daily living (e.g., bathing, toileting, walking). A primary goal of assisted living communities is to help residents maintain their health and well-being. However, little is known about how caregiving staff detect and interpret relevant cues, and what behaviors are taken to address concerns about residents. In addition to investigating these questions, the role of experience in the job was examined by comparing workers with a relatively low level of experience (1 month-16 months) to those with a relatively high level of experience (3+ years). These questions were addressed using a Critical Incident Interview and a Scenario-based Interview. The cues discussed by participants were categorized as Cognitive, Physical, or Emotional in nature. Participants reacted with concern to most of the scenarios, although the ratings they assigned to indicate their level of concern showed a high level of variability across participants. The explanations participants generated for the various scenarios were classified as either general or specific, with the majority of explanations coded as specific. Specific explanations were primarily that the situation was the result of a Cognitive/Emotional/Social issue or a Physical health issue. Of the actions participants described taking to handle the scenarios, gathering and using information was discussed far more than any other action. Participants discussed needing information related to the resident, such as their health, current and recent state, and personal history, as well as elaboration of the cues that initiated the concern in the first place, such as how long the symptom had been present. Participants also discussed various types of knowledge that they used in their decision making process. The most frequently discussed type of knowledge was health conditions and symptoms. Lastly, the data from the current study did not generally reveal differences between the two levels of experience that were examined. A revised model of caregiver decision making and practical contributions are discussed.
author2 Rogers, Wendy A.
author_facet Rogers, Wendy A.
McBride, Sara
author McBride, Sara
author_sort McBride, Sara
title Understanding the cognitive processes of problem detection and decision making among assisted living caregivers
title_short Understanding the cognitive processes of problem detection and decision making among assisted living caregivers
title_full Understanding the cognitive processes of problem detection and decision making among assisted living caregivers
title_fullStr Understanding the cognitive processes of problem detection and decision making among assisted living caregivers
title_full_unstemmed Understanding the cognitive processes of problem detection and decision making among assisted living caregivers
title_sort understanding the cognitive processes of problem detection and decision making among assisted living caregivers
publisher Georgia Institute of Technology
publishDate 2014
url http://hdl.handle.net/1853/51797
work_keys_str_mv AT mcbridesara understandingthecognitiveprocessesofproblemdetectionanddecisionmakingamongassistedlivingcaregivers
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