The precautionary and differentiated responsibility principles in the climate change context

The Precautionary Principle (PP) as formulated in the context of climate change requires countries to take measures to anticipate, prevent or minimize the causes of climate change and mitigate its adverse impacts despite a lack of full scientific certainty as to such causes. The Differentiated Respo...

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Main Author: Udemgba, Sonne
Other Authors: Mascher, Sharon
Format: Others
Language:en
Published: University of Saskatchewan 2005
Subjects:
Online Access:http://library.usask.ca/theses/available/etd-09132005-171902/
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spelling ndltd-USASK-oai-usask.ca-etd-09132005-1719022013-01-08T16:32:16Z The precautionary and differentiated responsibility principles in the climate change context Udemgba, Sonne Precautionary Principle Differentiated Responsibility Principle Kyoto Protocol Developing Countries Climate Change The Precautionary Principle (PP) as formulated in the context of climate change requires countries to take measures to anticipate, prevent or minimize the causes of climate change and mitigate its adverse impacts despite a lack of full scientific certainty as to such causes. The Differentiated Responsibility Principle (the DR Principle) recognizes a common responsibility of all countries to prevent climate change and calls on developed states to assume a leadership role in the global effort to prevent climate change. The DR Principle requires some developed countries to place a restriction on their GHG emissions. Unfortunately this means that at least in the short term, developing countries are not subject to greenhouse gas (GHG) emission targets, thereby exacerbating the climate change problem. <p>Implementing the DR Principle in this manner conflicts with the PP. To avoid this conflict, the DR Principle should be formulated in a manner which demands some restriction on GHG emission, by developing countries. Efforts to prevent human induced climate change should be made by all countries regardless of their individual culpability for climate change if the PP is to have effect. Mascher, Sharon Farnese, Patricia L. Bowden, Marie-Ann Noble, Bram F. University of Saskatchewan 2005-09-15 text application/pdf http://library.usask.ca/theses/available/etd-09132005-171902/ http://library.usask.ca/theses/available/etd-09132005-171902/ en unrestricted I hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to University of Saskatchewan or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.
collection NDLTD
language en
format Others
sources NDLTD
topic Precautionary Principle
Differentiated Responsibility Principle
Kyoto Protocol
Developing Countries
Climate Change
spellingShingle Precautionary Principle
Differentiated Responsibility Principle
Kyoto Protocol
Developing Countries
Climate Change
Udemgba, Sonne
The precautionary and differentiated responsibility principles in the climate change context
description The Precautionary Principle (PP) as formulated in the context of climate change requires countries to take measures to anticipate, prevent or minimize the causes of climate change and mitigate its adverse impacts despite a lack of full scientific certainty as to such causes. The Differentiated Responsibility Principle (the DR Principle) recognizes a common responsibility of all countries to prevent climate change and calls on developed states to assume a leadership role in the global effort to prevent climate change. The DR Principle requires some developed countries to place a restriction on their GHG emissions. Unfortunately this means that at least in the short term, developing countries are not subject to greenhouse gas (GHG) emission targets, thereby exacerbating the climate change problem. <p>Implementing the DR Principle in this manner conflicts with the PP. To avoid this conflict, the DR Principle should be formulated in a manner which demands some restriction on GHG emission, by developing countries. Efforts to prevent human induced climate change should be made by all countries regardless of their individual culpability for climate change if the PP is to have effect.
author2 Mascher, Sharon
author_facet Mascher, Sharon
Udemgba, Sonne
author Udemgba, Sonne
author_sort Udemgba, Sonne
title The precautionary and differentiated responsibility principles in the climate change context
title_short The precautionary and differentiated responsibility principles in the climate change context
title_full The precautionary and differentiated responsibility principles in the climate change context
title_fullStr The precautionary and differentiated responsibility principles in the climate change context
title_full_unstemmed The precautionary and differentiated responsibility principles in the climate change context
title_sort precautionary and differentiated responsibility principles in the climate change context
publisher University of Saskatchewan
publishDate 2005
url http://library.usask.ca/theses/available/etd-09132005-171902/
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