Are We Ready for Robots That Care for Us? Attitudes and Opinions of Older Adults Towards Socially Assistive Robots

Socially Assistive Robots (SAR) may help improve care delivery at home for older adults with cognitive impairment and reduce the burden of informal caregivers. Examining the views of these stakeholders on SAR is fundamental in order to conceive acceptable and useful SAR for dementia care. This study...

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Main Authors: Maribel ePino, Mélodie eBoulay, François eJouen, Anne Sophie Rigaud
Format: Article
Language:English
Published: Frontiers Media S.A. 2015-07-01
Series:Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Subjects:
Online Access:http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fnagi.2015.00141/full
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spelling doaj-7dafe92665b94a7f8eace876c92be1822020-11-24T21:06:30ZengFrontiers Media S.A.Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience1663-43652015-07-01710.3389/fnagi.2015.00141134066Are We Ready for Robots That Care for Us? Attitudes and Opinions of Older Adults Towards Socially Assistive RobotsMaribel ePino0Maribel ePino1Mélodie eBoulay2Mélodie eBoulay3François eJouen4Anne Sophie Rigaud5Anne Sophie Rigaud6Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de ParisUniversité René-DescartesAssistance Publique Hôpitaux de ParisUniversité René-DescartesEcole Pratique des Hautes EtudesAssistance Publique Hôpitaux de ParisUniversité René-DescartesSocially Assistive Robots (SAR) may help improve care delivery at home for older adults with cognitive impairment and reduce the burden of informal caregivers. Examining the views of these stakeholders on SAR is fundamental in order to conceive acceptable and useful SAR for dementia care. This study investigated SAR acceptance among three groups of older adults living in the community: persons with Mild Cognitive Impairment, informal caregivers of persons with dementia, and healthy older adults. Different technology acceptance questions related to the robot and user characteristics, potential applications, feelings about technology, ethical issues, and barriers and facilitators for SAR adoption, were addressed in a mixed-method study. Participants (n=25) completed a survey and took part in a focus group (n=7). A functional robot prototype, a multimedia presentation, and some use-case scenarios provided a base for the discussion. Content analysis was carried out based on recorded material from focus groups. Results indicated that an accurate insight of influential factors for SAR acceptance could be gained by combining quantitative and qualitative methods. Participants acknowledged the potential benefits of SAR for supporting care at home for individuals with cognitive impairment. In all the three groups, intention to use SAR was found to be lower for the present time than that anticipated for the future. However, caregivers and persons with MCI had a higher perceived usefulness and intention to use SAR, at the present time, than healthy older adults, confirming that current needs are strongly related to technology acceptance and should influence SAR design. A key theme that emerged in this study was the importance of customizing SAR appearance, services, and social capabilities. Mismatch between needs and solutions offered by the robot, usability factors, and lack of experience with technology, were seen as the most important barriers for SAR adoption.http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fnagi.2015.00141/fullDementiacognitive impairmentolder adultstechnology acceptanceInformal caregiverssocially assistive robots
collection DOAJ
language English
format Article
sources DOAJ
author Maribel ePino
Maribel ePino
Mélodie eBoulay
Mélodie eBoulay
François eJouen
Anne Sophie Rigaud
Anne Sophie Rigaud
spellingShingle Maribel ePino
Maribel ePino
Mélodie eBoulay
Mélodie eBoulay
François eJouen
Anne Sophie Rigaud
Anne Sophie Rigaud
Are We Ready for Robots That Care for Us? Attitudes and Opinions of Older Adults Towards Socially Assistive Robots
Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Dementia
cognitive impairment
older adults
technology acceptance
Informal caregivers
socially assistive robots
author_facet Maribel ePino
Maribel ePino
Mélodie eBoulay
Mélodie eBoulay
François eJouen
Anne Sophie Rigaud
Anne Sophie Rigaud
author_sort Maribel ePino
title Are We Ready for Robots That Care for Us? Attitudes and Opinions of Older Adults Towards Socially Assistive Robots
title_short Are We Ready for Robots That Care for Us? Attitudes and Opinions of Older Adults Towards Socially Assistive Robots
title_full Are We Ready for Robots That Care for Us? Attitudes and Opinions of Older Adults Towards Socially Assistive Robots
title_fullStr Are We Ready for Robots That Care for Us? Attitudes and Opinions of Older Adults Towards Socially Assistive Robots
title_full_unstemmed Are We Ready for Robots That Care for Us? Attitudes and Opinions of Older Adults Towards Socially Assistive Robots
title_sort are we ready for robots that care for us? attitudes and opinions of older adults towards socially assistive robots
publisher Frontiers Media S.A.
series Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience
issn 1663-4365
publishDate 2015-07-01
description Socially Assistive Robots (SAR) may help improve care delivery at home for older adults with cognitive impairment and reduce the burden of informal caregivers. Examining the views of these stakeholders on SAR is fundamental in order to conceive acceptable and useful SAR for dementia care. This study investigated SAR acceptance among three groups of older adults living in the community: persons with Mild Cognitive Impairment, informal caregivers of persons with dementia, and healthy older adults. Different technology acceptance questions related to the robot and user characteristics, potential applications, feelings about technology, ethical issues, and barriers and facilitators for SAR adoption, were addressed in a mixed-method study. Participants (n=25) completed a survey and took part in a focus group (n=7). A functional robot prototype, a multimedia presentation, and some use-case scenarios provided a base for the discussion. Content analysis was carried out based on recorded material from focus groups. Results indicated that an accurate insight of influential factors for SAR acceptance could be gained by combining quantitative and qualitative methods. Participants acknowledged the potential benefits of SAR for supporting care at home for individuals with cognitive impairment. In all the three groups, intention to use SAR was found to be lower for the present time than that anticipated for the future. However, caregivers and persons with MCI had a higher perceived usefulness and intention to use SAR, at the present time, than healthy older adults, confirming that current needs are strongly related to technology acceptance and should influence SAR design. A key theme that emerged in this study was the importance of customizing SAR appearance, services, and social capabilities. Mismatch between needs and solutions offered by the robot, usability factors, and lack of experience with technology, were seen as the most important barriers for SAR adoption.
topic Dementia
cognitive impairment
older adults
technology acceptance
Informal caregivers
socially assistive robots
url http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fnagi.2015.00141/full
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