Wide-range genetic connectivity of Coney, Cephalopholis fulva (Epinephelidae), through oceanic islands and continental Brazilian coast

The Epinephelidae form a group of species of high biological and economical interests. It´s phylogeographic patterns are not well known especially the distributed populations in the western region of the Atlantic Ocean. Among the representatives is a small species called Cephalopholis fulva, Coney,...

Full description

Bibliographic Details
Main Authors: Allyson S. de Souza, Eurico A. Dias Júnior, Pedro M. Galetti Jr, Erik G. Machado, Mauro Pichorim, Wagner F. Molina
Format: Article
Language:English
Published: Academia Brasileira de Ciências 2015-03-01
Series:Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências
Subjects:
Online Access:http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0001-37652015000100121&lng=en&tlng=en
Description
Summary:The Epinephelidae form a group of species of high biological and economical interests. It´s phylogeographic patterns are not well known especially the distributed populations in the western region of the Atlantic Ocean. Among the representatives is a small species called Cephalopholis fulva, Coney, which presents a wide geographical distribution, polychromia, hermaphroditism and is quickly becoming a large target for the exploration of commercial fishing. The genetic and historical demography were obtained through the partial sequence analysis of Control Region from six locations on the coastline of Brazil from the northeast coast to the southwest coast, including the oceanic islands of Rocas Atoll and Fernando de Noronha Archipelago. The analyzed samples revealed a high genetic variability and a strong gene flow among the sampled locations. Additionally, the genetic data revealed that population expansions probably occurred due to the changes in the sea levels that occurred during the Pleistocene. The large population connectivity found in Coney constitutes relevant conditions for their biological conservation.
ISSN:1678-2690